Documents: 5

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A IV 37
Parchment · I + 197+ II ff. · 24.3-24.5 x 17.5-17.8 cm · Ashkenaz · 2nd half 14th century and 2nd half 15th century
Moses Maimonides, Sefer Moreh Nevukhim

This 14th and 15th century Ashkenazi copy of the Sefer Moreh Nevukhim (Guide to the Perplexed) by Moses Maimonides is the Hebrew translation of the work made in 1204 by Samuel ben Judah Ibn Tibbon (1150-1230). This copy also includes a preface from the commentary to the Moreh Nevukhim by Shem Tov ben Joseph ben Shem Tov, a 15th century Spanish rabbi and vigorous defender of Aristotelian and Maimonidean philosophy. In the 16th century, this manuscript was owned by Johann Buxtorf II, and used as the base for the latter’s Latin edition of the Doctoris Perplexorum (Basel, 1629). (iss)

Online Since: 03/19/2020

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, AN IX 4
Parchment · III + 84 + III ff. · 21 x 15.4-16.3 cm · Ashkenaz · 2nd half 15th century
The Basel Nizzaḥon

The Sefer Nizzaḥon Yashan is the name of an anonymous anthology of arguments against the Christological interpretation of biblical verses, supplemented by critique of the Gospels and Christian doctrines and morals. Composed in Franco-Germany circa 1300, most confutations are based on polemical themes and criticisms of Christian faith which were disseminated in Jewish circles in medieval Ashkenaz and northern France. There are few extant editions and manuscripts of this work, one of which is the Basel Nizzaḥon. This manuscript which bears some similarities with the other copies, should nevertheless be considered as an indirect, yet important witness to Jewish apologetic from medieval Franco-Germany. (iss)

Online Since: 03/19/2020

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Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau, ALT 3
Parchment and paper · 117 ff. · 18 x 11.8 cm · last quarter of the 15th century (Part 1), 2nd half of the 16th century (Part 2)
Processional from St. Katharinental (TG)

This processional (from the Latin processio, 'to advance' and referring to processions inside and outside the church), containing the order of the procession as well as the chants and texts to be recited during processions, consists of two codicological parts. The first part is from the last quarter of the 15th century and contains chants and prayers for the entire liturgical year; it is decorated with seven multicolor illuminated initials depicting scenes from the Gospels. The sections to be sung have square notation in black. While the first part presumably was not created in and for the convent of St. Katharinental (TG), the second part names the stations and the relics that are carried; thus it is meant for the processions of the Dominican convent. (sol)

Online Since: 03/19/2020

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 14
Paper · 50 ff. · 16.5 x 11 cm · Ingolstadt · 1584–1589
Book of traditional costumes for Ladislaus von Törring

This paper manuscript – a Liber Amicorum for Ladislaus von Törring – contains 49 deptictions of costumes and four of coats-of-arms: all are high quality watercolors and probably all are by the same hand. The costumes mostly show high-ranking persons, mainly from France (Paris), Spain and Veneto. Means of transport, such as ships and carriages, from the same time period are also depicted. Some of the people pictured are identified by captions in French and Italian. Aphorisms and dedications, mostly in Latin, are added on seven pages. The dedicatee is Ladislaus von Törring (1566-1638), Baron in Stein and Pertenstein, Rector of the University of Ingolstadt, a relative of the Bavarian royal family. (eis)

Online Since: 03/19/2020

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Car. C 126
Parchment · I +167 ff. · 23 x 17.8 cm · Sepharad (Catalonia ?) · 1292
Moses Maimonides, Sefer Moreh Nevukhim

This elegant illuminated copy of the Sefer Moreh Nevukhim (Guide to the Perplexed) by Moses Maimonides was produced in Christian Spain in 1292. It is a copy of the Hebrew translation of the work made in 1204 by Samuel ben Judah Ibn Tibbon (1150-1230). The manuscript arrived in Italy either after the Jewish persecutions of 1391 or the ensuing expulsion of the Jews from the Iberian peninsula in 1492. It was in the possession of the renowned Bolognese Sforno family before reappearing in the early 17th century in the hands of the Italian Jewish apostate and inquisitor Renato da Modena. After more than a century, the manuscript reappeared in the possession of Johann Caspar Ulrich (1705-1768) a Protestant theologian, who donated it in 1762 to the Bibliotheca Ecclesia Carolina, the chapter library of the reformed Grossmünster church of Zurich. In 1835, when the chapter was dissolved, the books and manuscripts of the chapter library became part of the new Cantonal Library in Zurich. Finally in 1917, the holdings of this library, among others, formed the new Zentralbibliothek, where the manuscript still remains today. (iss)

Online Since: 03/19/2020

Documents: 5