Documents: 49, displayed: 1 - 20

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 46
Parchment · 265 ff. · 34.9 x 22.9 cm · Italy (Florence) · 16th century (ca. 1513-1521)
Cassiodorus, Variae

This elegant codex, written in humanistic script, was commissioned by Pope Leo X († 1521). The Medici coat of arms can be found in the middle of the original binding’s cover, in a rich frieze on the frontispiece, and in the initials on f. 3v and f. 134v. The decoration is attributed to the famous Florentine illuminator Attavante degli Attavanti († 1525) or his circle. This codex is from the collection of Major J.R. Abbey. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 65
Parchment · 77 ff. · 34.8 x 24.8 cm · France (?) · second half of the 12th century
Eusebius Caesariensis, Historia ecclesiastica · Rufinus Aquileiensis, Historia ecclesiastica (I-II)

This manuscript, probably of French origin, contains Eusebius of Caesarea’s Historia ecclesiastica in the translation of Rufinus, as well as Books I-II of Rufinus’ continuation thereof. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 70
Parchment · 114 ff. · 19.5 x 13 cm · England · 15th century
Galfredus Monumetensis, Historia regum Britanniae

This manuscript of English origin contains the Historia Regum Britannie by Geoffrey of Monmouth (ca. 1100-1154). At the end of the text (114v), the writer transcribed some annotations regarding the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy, a note about Edward I, King of England, and about the defeat Edward II suffered at Bannockburn. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 71
Parchment · I + 49 + I ff. · 29.1 x 21.5 cm · 15th century
Gervais du Bus, Roman de Fauvel

The Roman de Fauvel is a French poem in verse, written in the 14th century by various authors, among them the cleric Gervais du Bus. It has survived in no more than 15 manuscripts. With the metaphor of a donkey that becomes its owner’s lord, the poem presents a critique of the corruption of the church and of the political system. The manuscript is written in a bastarda script; the decoration remains incomplete. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 73
Paper · 154 ff. · 28.5 x 21 cm · Bavaria · 1461
Gesta romanorum (Ger.)

This manuscript contains the German version of the Gesta Romanorum, a collection of anecdotes and tales originally in Latin that were compiled around the end of the 13th or the beginning of the 14th century. It was very popular throughout the entire Middle Ages and was published repeatedly. This codex was written 1461 (f. 150vb) in Bavaria. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 76
Parchment · II + 166 ff. · 31.3 x 22 cm · Italy · 12th century
Gregorius Magnus, Homiliae in Ezechielem

This codex from Italy contains Gregory the Great’s Homiliae in Ezechielem. The anathema Quicumque eum vendiderit vel alienaverit vel hanc scripturam raserit anathema sit is on f. 1r, as well as a partially erased ex libris that mentions a Convent of St. Agnes. The codex was purchased by Martin Bodmer in 1962; earlier perhaps it belonged to the Church of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice and then to Abbot Celotti, to the library of Thomas Phillips, and to Sir Sydney Cocherell. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 80
Parchment · I + 43 + I ff. · 18.7 x 14-14.7 cm · Germany (Tegernsee?) · 10th, 11th, 13th century
Gunzo Novariensis, Epistula ad Augienses · Lampertus Hersfeldensis, Vita S. Lulli Moguntini · Concilium Lateranense IV, Canones seu Decreta

Manuscript in three parts. The first part (f. 1r-20v) contains the oldest version of Gunzo’s Epistola ad Augienses and can be dated to the 10th century. The second part (f. 21r-27v) probably is the original core of the codex, to which the other two pieces were added; it contains the autograph of Lambert of Hersfeld’s Vita s. Lulli episcopi Moguntini and dates to the 11th century. The third part (f. 28r-43v) is from the 13th century and contains the transcripts of the Constitutiones of the Fourth Council of the Lateran (1215). This codex is from the Benedictine Tegernsee Abbey (the first part is mentioned in the monastery’s library catalog); later it became part of the collection of the Princes of Oettingen-Wallerstein and in 1948 the antiquarian book dealers Rosenthal sold it to Martin Bodmer. The old guard-leaves are fragments of a liturgical manuscript from the Diocese of Freising. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 79(522)
Parchment · 109 pp. · 24.5 x 19 cm · Einsiedeln · 10th century
Musica enchiriadis

This codex can be dated to the 10th century; it contains the Musica enchiriadis (2-27), a 9th century music theory treatise which endeavors to develop a series of rules for polyphonic composition, as well as annotations to the commentary Scolica enchiriadis (27-45, 66-102). Dasian notation is used in order to graphically illustrate the music. For a long time, this treatise was attributed to the monk Hucbald, but today it is considered the work of an anonymous author. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 193(66)
Parchment · II + 218 (220) ff. · 35.3 x 23.7 cm · Switzerland (Einsiedeln?) or Austria · 12th century
Decretum Gratiani

A 12th century manuscript (1170-1190), probably copied in Switzerland (Einsiedeln?) or in Austria. It contains the introduction In prima parte agitur (fol. 1r-7ra) and the Decretum by Gratian [Σ-group, cf. C. Wei, A Discussion and List of Manuscripts Belonging to the Σ-group (S-group)] (fol. 7ra-217va); an additio (from fol. 167vb to C.29: Adrianus papa Eberhardo Salzeburgensi archiepiscopo. 'Dignum est et a rationis... [JL 10445: 1154-59]); various excerpts of glosses (scraped on fol. 21a) and excerpta of the Summa by Rufinus (cf. R. Weigand, Die Glossen zum Dekret Gratians. Studien zu den frühen Glossen und Glossenkompositionen, Roma 1991, pp. 737-740); fragments of the Glossa Ordinaria by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis (France, middle of the 13th century) were copied onto the erasures on fol. 6va-9va. (mur)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 250(382)
Parchment · 426 (428) pp. · 29.6 x 23.6 cm · Einsiedeln · 12th century
Vitae Sanctorum

This manuscript, together with Cod. 247(379), 248(380) and 249(381), constitutes the four volumes of a collection of lives of the saints and passions of the martyrs, arranged according to the liturgical year. Without a doubt these four volumes were used in Einsiedeln, where most likely they also were produced. Each life is introduced with a large rubricated initial, and numerous glosses and maniculae by Heinrich von Ligerz were inserted along the margins. The original endpapers, now removed, left traces of a liturgical text with neumes on the inside of the cover and traces of an illuminated initial on the inside of the back cover. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 298(119)
Parchment · 146 pp. · 34 x 26.8 cm · France/Lotharingia · 10th century
Boetii geometria et musica

Boethius is the author of the two treatises preserved in this 10th century manuscript: De geometria (1-22) and De musica (23-145). The two texts are surrounded by numerous sketches and marginal as well as interlinear glosses. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 312(541)
Parchment · 296 ff. · 23.5 x 29.6 cm · Southern Germany/Switzerland · 10th/11th century
Prudentius: Praefatio, Cathemerinon, Apotheosis, Hamartigenia, Psychomachia, Contra Symmachum and Peristephanon

This manuscript contains several works by Prudentius and was written by various scribes. The test is surrounded by mostly interlinear glosses; most of these are in Latin, some are in Alemannic dialect. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 671(655)
Paper · 164 ff. · 21 x 13.5/14 cm · Zurich, Convent of Dominican Sisters of St. Verena · 1449
Lives of the Saints

This manuscript was produced in the Convent of Dominican Sisters of St. Verena in Zurich in 1449. In addition to the life of Benedict following Gregory’s Dialogi, in a unique translation that seems to exist only in this codex (according to Werner Williams-Krapp), the manuscript contains translations of three more legends of 13th century Dominican saints. These as well are attested only in this codex, have practically never been studied, and have not even been edited. First there is one of three versions of the translation of the Vita S. Dominici by Dietrich of Apolda; then there is the translation of Thomas Agno de Lentino's Legenda maior about the Inquisitor Peter of Milan (also know as Peter Martyr or Peter of Verona), who was killed in 1252; attached to this is the bull of his canonization issued by Pope Innocent IV in 1253. It is noteworthy that the translation of the bull also contains a legend of Peter which, according to Regina D. Schiewer, is independent of the one by Thomas Agno. If the translations of these legends into Alemannic that are contained in Cod. 671 were in fact created around 1300, as assumed by Schwierer, then the (abbreviated?) version of the translation of the life of Dominic contained in Cod. 671 would constitute the earliest proof of the presence of the revelations of Mechthild of Magdeburg in Southwestern Germany, as the final chapter of the fifth book of the life of Dominic (cf. fol. 80v-82r) is based on excerpts from the Latin translation of Das Fließende Licht der Gottheit. (nem)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, COD 1075
Parchment · 9 + 103 + 4 pp. · 49.5 x 35 cm · Lucerne · 1739
Copy in calligraphy of the Sworn Letter of Lucerne (“Geschworener Brief”)

The Sworn Letter (“Geschworener Brief”), drawn up for the first time in 1252, consists mainly of provisions of criminal law for the sake of maintaining internal peace. It soon attained the status of a social contract that was periodically revised, and the town assembly was sworn into office each year with an oath on this document. COD 1075 presents the last version in a special form: The text was elaborately arranged in calligraphy by chancery clerk Josef Corneli Mahler; the articles are introduced by artistic initials and are accompanied by figures (which bear no reference to the themes of the text). For the binding, the wooden boards are covered in blue and white velvet and have protective book corners, clasps and bosses made of silver. (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, COD 1080
Parchment · 256 ff. · 47 x 22 cm · Lucerne · 1433
Silbernes Buch (Silver Book)

In 1433 town clerk Egloff Etterlin compiled a cartulary with copies of documents relevant to the laws of Lucerne, including translations of Latin texts. The volume permitted the council quick access to these texts; thus it served as a finding aid for the originals stored in the water tower (« Wasserturm »). These copies of 150 documents (with 21 translations) do not render the originals in chronological order, but are instead ordered by topic. They were written by various scribes of the Lucerne chancery and go up to the year 1492. This volume receives its name from the magnificent 1505 cover of velvet and taffeta over wooden boards, decorated with silver bosses and clasps with the coat of arms of Lucerne. (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, COD 3655
Parchment · 1 + 71 + 2 ff. · 31 x 23.5 cm · Lucerne · 1357-1479
1st Register of Citizens (1. Bürgerbuch)

Strictly speaking, this manuscript (COD 3655) is a “Stadtbuch” (city register). In addition to the lists of new citizens up to 1441 (actually the oldest register of citizens written by town clerk Werner Hofmeier fol. 1r-53v), it contains statutes, copies of documents, notes regarding the administration (including a catalog of the treasure of St. Peter's Chapel, fol. 19r, and an instruction manual for the new clock in the “Graggenturm”, fol. 24r), as well as chronicled notes. Worth mentioning among the latter are notes about the battles of Sempach (fol. 22r), Näfels (fol. 22r) and Arbedo (fol. 49r). The binding of wooden boards covered in pigskin, on which is painted the coat of arms of Lucerne, dates from the second half of the 16th century. (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, COD 3665
Parchment · 38 + 3 ff. · 40 x 30 cm · Lucerne · 1479-1572
2nd Register of Citizens (2. Bürgerbuch)

This second Register of Citizens contains the list of new citizens for Lucerne from 1479 until 1572. The volume ist valuable as a source regarding immigration to Lucerne, since the individual entries give not only the names of the new citizens, but also their exact origins. At the same time it shows the gradual isolation of the citizenry of Lucerne over the course of the 16th century, as fewer and fewer newcomers were able to enjoy the rights of citizenship. In addition to the original register, which is ordered by first names, the imposing leather-bound volume also contains an index by the municipal archivist Joseph Schneller († 1879). (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, KA 140
Paper · 129 + 21 ff. · 20 x 16.5 cm · 1718
Claviculus Salomonis

As part of a great lawsuit against necromancers and treasure seekers, the Lucerne authorities in 1718 confiscated this meticulous copy of the Schlüssel Salomos, a book of spells that had evidently been widely read in certain quarters and of which various versions had been in circulation. Through the rituals for conjuring spirits described in the book, people around the priest Hans Kaspar Giger hoped to become wealthy. The volume was labeled “superstitious” by the authorities, was sealed and placed in the archives. (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, KF 80
Parchment · 4 + 67 + 6 ff. · 42 x 28.5 cm · Lucerne · after 1500
Necrology of the Franciscan Monastery of Lucerne

The oldest necrology of the Franciscan Monastery of Lucerne has not survived; KF 80 is the second necrology and includes parts of the lost first volume; the entries go up to 1734. Two important donor families, who were particularly close to the monastery, were remembered specifically in a separate section with their family coats of arms: the Martin family (fol. 17v) and the Sonnenberg family (fol. 62-63v). After the dissolution of the monastery, this volume, along with the monastery archives, became part of the state archives in 1838. (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Luzern, Staatsarchiv, KU 4a
Paper · 240 + 13 ff. · 38.5 x 29 cm · Lucerne · around 1470
“Weissbuch” of St. Urban's Abbey

Together with the “Schwarzbuch” (KU 4b), this urbarium offers a comprehensive overview of the rights and possessions of the Cistercian Abbey, which reached its economic peak in the second half of the 15th century. Copies of documents and compilations of rights and dues, organized according to geographic criteria, demonstrate the size of the abbey’s possessions. The “Weissbuch” covers the core of St. Urban’s manorial power around Pfaffnau and Roggliswil and in the Bernese Upper Aargau region. After the dissolution of the monastery, this volume, along with the monastery archives, became part of the state archives in 1848. (jag)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

Documents: 49, displayed: 1 - 20