Documents: 41, displayed: 1 - 20

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[sine loco], codices restituti, Cod. 5 (Biblia latina)
Parchment · 18 ff. · 15.5-46 x 10.5-33.5 · France: Tours · early 9th century
Biblia latina

Remnants of an Alcuin's Bible, written in Tours in the early 9th century; from the Dominican Monastery of Bern; around 1495 the remnants were used as pastedowns for various incunables by the bookbinder Johannes Vatter. After the secularization of the monastery in 1528, the host volumes by various paths reached the Municipal Library of Bern and various libraries in Solothurn. Around 1945, the fragments BBB Cod. 756.59 (1 leaf), Cod. 756.70 (8 leaves and 1 strip) as well as Cod. 756.71 (2 leaves) were removed from the host volumes by Johannes Lindt; today they can be found in the Burgerbibliothek Bern (BBB). Also in situ, i.e., in incunables from the University Library Bern (MUE), is a further leaf (MUE Inc. I.20) or smaller fragments (MUE Inc. IV.77). In addition, the Central Library of Solothurn holds: Cod. S 458 (pastedowns) as well as S II 151 (detached fragments). (mit/hol)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A VI 14
Paper · 147 ff. · 29 x 21.5 cm · Basel · 1466
Theological and legal texts related to the Carthusians

This volume contains a large number of texts about theology and canon law. All of it was written by one scribe, the Carthusian Heinrich von Vullenhoe of Basel. In a long note he provides information about the motives that guided him during the compilation: Since as a Carthusian he could not himself act as a preacher, he only had the possibility to spread the Word of God with his hands, i.e. by writing books. He expresses the hope that this compilation he has organized may strengthen the pious on their path and may offer an occasion for remorse for the sinners. Many of the texts that Vullenhoe has combined in this volume refer directly to the Carthusian Order. One example is the treatise de esu carnium, which defends the Carthusian practice of renouncing meat as a foodstuff. Many texts have also been handed down in other manuscripts from the Carthusian Monastery of Basel. (fis)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A VIII 27
Paper · 223 ff. · 21 x 14 cm · Basel · second half of the 15th century
Devotionalia

This volume from the Carthusian Monastery of Basel contains prayers and meditations by various authors, but most of them written by, or at least attributed to, Anselm of Canterbury. In addition, there is an instruction in spiritual exercises for novices and a Passion of Christ compiled from all four Gospels by Heinrich Arnoldi. Texts by other Carthusian authors are also represented. The codex was written by Martin Ströulin, a Carthusian from Basel. (mue)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B III 7
Parchment · 165 ff. · 33.5 x 25 cm · about 1300
Thomas Aquinas: Summa contra gentiles

The parchment manuscript, decorated with filigree and Lombard initials, originally belonged to the Carthusian Monastery of Mainz and reached the Carthusian Monastery of Basel via several stations. It contains Thomas Aquinas' Summa contra gentiles, written between 1259 and 1265. This manual for Christian missionaries offers philosophical arguments for Christianity and is especially designed for the conversion of Muslim and Jewish believers of other faiths; it is the only scholastic work to have been translated from Latin into Hebrew. (mue)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B X 40
Parchment · 26 ff. · 13-13.5 x 10 cm · 14th/15th century
Penitential Psalms

This small-format parchment volume contains the seven penitential psalms as well as three more psalms in Hebrew. It was owned by the Amerbach family and later probably passed into the hands of Johann Buxtorf (the elder?). The manuscript is decorated in a restrained manner with ornamental initials and pen sketches in the blank spaces; the text is vocalized. (flr)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B XI 19
Parchment and paper · 183 ff. · 10-10.5 x 7.5 cm · in part Basel · 2nd half of the 15th century and 2nd half of the 14th century
Book of prayers and devotions

This composite volume, originally composed of ten fascicles, was at least partly written in the Carthusian Monastery of Basel. One of the writers is Hans Lesser, a brother from St. Gallen. The small-format manuscript was part of the library of the lay brothers of the Carthusian Monastery of Basel and contains various German-language prayers and devotional texts, some of which refer explicitly to the lay brothers of the Carthusian Monastery. (stu)

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, D IV 10
Paper · 197 ff. · 21.5 x 14.5 + 3 cm · about 1475
Composite manuscript (chronicles)

The core of this manuscript from the Carthusian Monastery of Basel is a copy of the Flores temporum, a Latin world chronicle from the 13th century that was widely used in Alemannic areas. The copyist, Nicolaus Gerung de Blauenstein, supplemented this chronicle with a self-written, partly German appendix on events from the region around Basel as well as a chronicle of the Basel bishops. Shorter texts such as treatises on councils or on the Carthusian order and lists of emperors, cathedrals, kingdoms and languages in various parts of the world round off the collection. (mue)

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, E II 2
Parchment · 93 ff. · 34 x 25-25.5 cm · Bavaria (Austria?) · 1322
Ulrich von Etzenbach: Alexander

This manuscript, although incomplete due to leaf loss, contains the Alexander novel by the German-Bohemian poet Ulrich von Etzenbach (c. 13th century). The text was written in 1322, presumably in Bavaria or Austria judging by the dialect characteristics. The elaborate decoration with initials at the beginning of the individual books shows Upper Rhine characteristics as they also appear in Lower Austria at the beginning of the 14th century. In the margins, there are numerous 19th century explanations of words as well as annotations by Johann Jakob Spreng (1699-1768), who copied the manuscript in the 18th century. (flr)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, F III 34
Parchment · 90 ff. · 25.5 x 17.5 cm · 13th century
Composite manuscript (natural science and theology)

This manuscript, written in a 13th century textura, was the property of the cleric and historian Dietrich von Niem (1340-1418), who provided it with numerous marginal notes. The volume, which was passed on to the Carthusian Monastery of Basel, contains, among others, Seneca’s Naturales quaestiones, the discussion Cur deus homo? by Anselm of Canterbury, and the astrological work De radiis stellarum by the Arab philosopher and scientist Alkindi. It also contains the article De probatione virginitatis beatae Mariae from the so-called "Suda", a Byzantine encyclopedia widely used in the Latin translation by Roberto Grosseteste. (flr)

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, G2 II 73
Paper · 32 ff. · 20 x 14 cm · Alemannic speaking region, possibly Basel · first halft of the 15th century
Laurin or Der kleine Rosengarten (King Laurin, the Rosengarten Group)

This manuscript with the Middle High German epic poem "Laurin" about Dietrich of Bern came to the Basel University Library in a truly adventurous manner. As the head librarian Ludwig Sieber (1833-1891) himself notes in the manuscript, the codex was found on the banks of the Rhine in Basel in 1878. It was then donated to the university library by Ludwig Sieber and his predecessor Wilhelm Vischer (head librarian 1867-1871). The place of discovery left its mark on the manuscript: In parts, the paper and binding are very damaged and fragile and show water damage in various places, especially at the edges of the leaves. The text, however, is still very legible, although incompletely preserved. Fragments of documents in the binding and the pen-and-ink drawing of a flag with a Basel staff make a reference to Basel as a possible place of origin. (stu)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, N I 3:95c
Parchment · 2 ff. · 15.5 x 10 cm · 2nd quarter of the 14th century
David of Augsburg and the «geistlicher Palmbaum» (fragment)

This bifolium from a late Medieval mystical manuscript has been preserved as a book cover. It contains parts from the “Sieben Vorregeln” and from the “Spiegel der Tugend” by the Franciscan David of Augsburg (c. 1200-1272) as well as a section from the “Geistlicher Palmbaum” (from the “Palmbaumtraktaten”?). The fragment shows clear signs of wear due to its secondary use. (flr)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 200
Parchment · VII + 258 + XIII ff. · 30 x 22 cm · Ashkenaz · 1290
Lexicographical and scientific miscellany

This medieval Hebrew lexicographical and scientific miscellany dates back to 1290 and encloses three highly important texts, used as the base for published editions and studies. These are: the Maḥberet Menahem by Menahem ben Jacob Ibn Saruq (died c. 970); an anonymous Hebrew prose translation of the very popular Old French version of the lapidary by Marbode of Rennes (12th c.) and lastly, an anonymous abridged version of the talmudic and midrashic lexicon entitled Sefer ha-Arukh by Natan ben Yehiel Anav of Rome (1035-1110), called the Berner Kleiner Arukh. The particularity of this copy is the presence of Old West Yiddish and Old French glosses. Furthermore, among the numerous later notes, there are more significant additions which abound in the blank pages and margins of the manuscript, the most unusual of which is a charm in Middle High German in Hebrew characters, relative to Hulda, a German goddess comparable to Venus, taken from the Tannhäuserlied. Moreover, this manuscript belonged to several famous Jewish and Christians owners, whose scriptural witness testifies to the manuscript’s remarkable stature as a treasured source of knowledge from the time it was compiled at the end of the 13th century, to its possession by Christian Hebraists in Switzerland during the 16th and 17th centuries. (iss)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 756.59
Parchment · 1 f. · 46 x 32 cm · France, Tours · early 9th century
Biblia latina: Vulgata, recensio Alcuini (fragment)

Remnants of an Alcuin's Bible from the Dominican Monastery of Bern, which were used around 1495 by the bookbinder Johannes Vatter as pastedowns for various incunables that are currently held in Bern and Solothurn. After the secularization of the monastery in 1528, the host volume (MUE Inc I 85) became the property of Eberhard Rümlang (ca. 1500–1551) and Wolfgang Musculus (= Müslin, 1497–1563), who donated the volume to the Bern library in 1556. Around 1945, the fragments were removed from the host volumes by Johannes Lindt. Reunification of the fragments : [sine loco], codices restituti, Cod. 5 (Biblia latina). (mit)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 756.70
Parchment · 9 ff. · 33-34 x 25.5-26.5 cm · France: Tours · early 9th century
Biblia latina: Vulgata, recensio Alcuini (fragment)

Remnants of an Alcuin's Bible from the Dominican Monastery of Bern, which were used around 1495 by the bookbinder Johannes Vatter as pastedowns for various incunables that are currently held in Bern and Solothurn. After the secularization of the monastery in 1528, the host volumes (MUE Inc. III.15, Vol. 3–4; the strip of Cod. 756.70e is from MUE Inc. I.6), perhaps as part of a bequest of books by the Venner [standard bearer] Jürg Schöni in 1534, became part of the Bern library. Around 1945, the fragments were removed from the host volumes by Johannes Lindt. Reunification of the fragments: [sine loco], codices restituti, Cod. 5 (Biblia latina). (mit)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 756.71
Parchment · 2 ff. · 26.5 x 33.5/31.5 cm · France, Tours · early 9th century
Biblia latina: Vulgata, recensio Alcuini (fragment)

Remnants of an Alcuin's Bible from the Dominican Monastery of Bern, which were used around 1495 by the bookbinder Johannes Vatter as pastedowns for various incunables that are currently held in Bern and Solothurn. After the secularization of the monastery in 1528, the host volume (MUE Inc. III.15, Vol. 1) perhaps as part of a bequest of books by the Venner [standard bearer] Jürg Schöni in 1534, became part of the Bern library. Around 1945, the fragments were removed from the host volumes by Johannes Lindt. Reunification of the fragments: [sine loco], codices restituti, Cod. 5 (Biblia latina). (mit)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, MUE Inc I 20
Parchment · 1 f. · 29 x 23.5-24 cm · France, Tours · early 9th century
Biblia latina: Vulgata, recensio Alcuini (fragment)

Remnants of an Alcuin's Bible from the Dominican Monastery of Bern, which were used around 1495 by the bookbinder Johannes Vatter as pastedowns for various incunables that are currently held in Bern and Solothurn. After the secularization of the monastery in 1528, the host volume (MUE Inc. I.20) perhaps as part of a bequest of books by the Venner [standard bearer] Jürg Schöni in 1534, became part of the Bern library. Reunification of the fragments: [sine loco], codices restituti, Cod. 5 (Biblia latina). (mit)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 41
Parchment · I + 48 + I ff. · 24 x 17.8 cm · Northern Italy (Bologna?) · 2nd half of the 14th century
Boethius, De consolatione Philosophiae

Boethius' De consolatione Philosophiae knew continuous success during the Middle Ages. This 14th century manuscript offers a complete copy of the Latin text with some interlinear glosses. The book decoration consists of a historiated initial with a half-length frontal portrait of the author as he points to his book (f. 1). From this  initial sprouts a short leaf scroll. In addition there are very beautiful decorated initials placed at the beginning of the various books of  the Consolatione (f. 8, 17, 30 and 41). Their style indicates that the manuscript was made in northern Italy, perhaps Bologna. (rou)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 140
Parchment · 2 ff. · 42.5 x 56.5 cm · Livorno (?) · second half of the 17th century
Nautical charts of the Mediterranean Sea, attributed to Giovanni Cavallini or Pietro Cavallini (?)

These two illuminated maps probably were part of an atlas of nautical charts of the Mediterranean, also called Portolan. The first map is north-facing and shows a part of the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and of the Mediterranean on both sides of the Strait of Gibraltar, between the Canary Islands and northern Italy. The second map is western-facing and shows the islands of the Aegean Sea between Crete (Candia) and Thessaloniki, Greece and Asia Minor, with Troy and Constantinople sketched in anachronistically. A scale for the latitudes on the first map, graduated distance scales near the margins, rhumb lines, and wind roses decorated with fleurs-de-lis accompany the red and black coastal toponyms written perpendicular to the coasts. Their very stylized arrangement emphasizes the headlands and estuaries, and the cartographer also depicted some rivers, albeit without great precision. In the interior and rather vaguely placed are miniature pictures of cities with banners, mountains, and trees. At sea, a few ships and a marine animal appear on both maps. The names of the regions are written on banners or in larger letters. The particular style of the design of the cities, the decorations, and the writing refers back to the work of Giovanni Battista Cavallini or his successor Pietro Cavallini, who worked in Livorno between 1636 and 1688. (vag)

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Frauenfeld, Historisches Museum Thurgau, T 5441
Parchment · 1 f. · 12.5 x 12.5 cm · around 1300
Illuminated initial "Jesus in the Temple" from an antiphonary from a convent of Dominican nuns, probably from St. Katharinental in Diessenhofen

This finely painted illustration, executed in vibrant and colorful opaque colors, has been cut out. It depicts the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple as described in the Gospel of Luke. Mary and Joseph bring the infant to the old prophet Simeon in order to receive his blessing. One of the two women behind Mary holds two doves in her right hand, which are to be sacrificed according to the requirements. In her left hand the woman carries burning candles, which indicate the feast to which this event is dedicated, i.e. Candlemas. Below Jesus, three small kneeling figures are praying: a Dominican nun and the donor couple. The scene is inserted into an N-initial decorated with scroll ornamentation at the beginning of the Canticle of Simeon for the feast of Mary: Nunc dimittis, domine, servum tuum in pace (Lord, now let your servant depart in peace, according to your word). The words visible at the top Intercede pro nobis (Pray for us [Holy Mother of God]) follow at the end of the song. An excerpt from the liturgical antiphon with the text Postquam impleti sunt dies purgationis (When the days of purification were completed) is preserved on the back. This fragment was purchased at auction at Sotheby's in London by the Canton of Thurgau in 1978; it came from the collection of Robert von Hirsch of Basel (1883–1977). (sue)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

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Frauenfeld, Historisches Museum Thurgau, T 9393
Parchment · 1 f. · 22.5 x 18.5 cm · around 1320
Miniature depicting the “Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin Mary“ from an antiphonary, possibly from the Convent of Cistercian nuns at Salem

This miniature was cut from a deluxe manuscript. The Annunciation of the Lord, depicted in the initial M-of the text Missus est Gabriel (Gabriel was sent), is celebrated on March 25. The Archangel Gabriel and Mary face each other in a vertically rectangular, geometrically designed border, each framed by an arch of the M. Gabriel holds a banderole with his greeting to the listening Mary AVE GRACIA PLENA (Hail Mary, full of grace). The side pillars of the letter M lead down into palmette leaves, which have been carefully cut out and thus protrude into the area surrounding the miniature. Above the palm leaves on the right there are red note lines and a single note. This illustration is from a particularly large-format book, an illustration of high painterly quality with light opaque colors in pink, green and blue tones, which are finely graded. The musical text on the back can be assigned to verses 2.2, 4.11 and 4.13 of the Song of Songs. This leaf comes from the same chorale manuscript as the miniature with the representation of the "Death of the Virgin". Both leaves show stations from the cycle of The Life of the Virgin, with T09393 illustrating the first stage and T 9394 the last. Stylistically they can be placed alongside three leaves from the collection de Bastard d'Estang in the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris (AD 152G, PL 842-3, AD 150H, PL 51). In 1994, the canton of Thurgau commercially acquired both fragments in Paris. Previously, they had been privately held in Switzerland. (sue)

Online Since: 12/12/2019

Documents: 41, displayed: 1 - 20