Documents: 59, displayed: 41 - 59

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 58
Parchment · 158 pp. · 27.5-28 x 19 cm · St. Gall (?) · around 1200
Bible (Mc) with Glossa ordinaria

This codex contains the Gospel of Mark with the Monarchian prologue (Stegmüller, Repertorium Biblicum, No. 607; pp. 3-8) and the Glossa ordinaria. The manuscript, bound in a Romanesque binding, was probably written towards the end of the 12th century, possibly also at the beginning of the 13th century. It is unclear whether it was written in St. Gall, but the ownership entry Liber sancti Galli from the 13th century (p. 2) indicates that it was already in the monastery of St. Gall at that time. (sno)

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 59
Parchment · 232 pp. · 26.5 x 17.5 cm · St. Gall (?) · around 1200
Bible (Lc) with Glossa ordinaria

This codex contains the Gospel of Luke with the Glossa ordinaria. The manuscript, bound in a Romanesque binding, was probably written towards the end of the 12th century, possibly also at the beginning of the 13th century. It is unclear whether it was written in St. Gall. The decoration consists of two initials with scroll ornamentation. On p. 1 there is a red Q with green and blue filling, whose tail is formed by a dragon; on p. 2 there is an F framed in red and filled in gold, with green scrolls with blue filling. (sno)

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 62
Parchment · 222 pp. · 22.5 x 15.5 cm · St. Gall (?) · around 1200
Bible (Jn) with Glossa ordinaria

This codex contains the Gospel of John with the Monarchian prologue (Stegmüller, Repertorium Biblicum, No. 624; pp. 3-7), an anonymous prologue (Stegmüller, RB 628; pp. 3-7, margin), and the Glossa ordinaria. The manuscript, bound in a Romanesque binding, was probably written towards the end of the 12th century, possibly also at the beginning of the 13th century. It is unclear whether it was written in St. Gall, but the ownership note Liber sancti Galli from the 13th century (p. 2) indicates that it was already in the monastery of St. Gall at that time. (sno)

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 515
Paper · 185 ff. · 14 x 10 cm · around 1500
Private prayer book in German

This small-format prayer book in German contains prayers to Christ, on the Passion and on Communion, to Mary, Mother of God, and to various saints, further prayers on various topics, reflections on the Passion, and devotions according to Johannes Gerson. On f. 38v and 39r there are two full-page miniatures. They depict Christ on the cross with Mary and John (f. 38v) and the Pietà with the instruments of torture (Arma Christi, f. 39r). The manuscript was probably written for a women's convent or for female users, although some male forms also appear in the prayers. According to the ownership note on f. 185r, in the 17th century the book was owned by the Benedictine Convent St. Wiborada in St. Georgen above St. Gall. (sno)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S86
Parchment · 1 f. · 33 x 156 cm · Eastern Europe · around 1900
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

By its style, the case of this megillah (h: 47cm) can be attributed to religious Jewish art of Eastern Europe. The silver is punched, chased, cast and partially gilded. The double-headed eagle is the heraldic animal of the Habsburgs and of the Russian Tsar. On the shield is a quote from Esther 8:16: “But unto the Jews there came a light and joy and gladness and glory”, and the flags flanking the shield are inscribed: “And the royal crown shall be set upon his head” (Esther 6:8). Numerous of flower, fruit and leaf ornaments, interspersed with representations of animals, cover the case. The scroll can be pulled out by a clasp in the shape of a small lion. (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S90
Parchment · 1 f. · 30.5 x 461 cm · Italy · around 1650
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

The opening panel of this megillah (on 4 leaves with 34 columns of text) shows a rampant lion with a palm frond, surrounded by four birds and insects. Above it, an inscription gives the name “Salomon Marinozzi”, presumably the original owner. To its right, a cartouche containing the name of his son as owner, was probably added later: “This scroll belongs to Mordecai, son of Solomon Marinozzi of blessed memory, and it was bought by Solomon […] in the year 1652.” (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S91
Parchment · 1 f. · 17 x 216 cm · Morocco (Meknes?) · around 1800
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

Influenced by the Islamic culture of North Africa, this megillah (on three sheets with 19 columns of text) dispenses with figurative representations and uses the formal language of Islamic art with its manifoldly varied ornaments. The text is adorned by an arcade that extends over the entire scroll. The decoration most closely resembles that of some ketubot from the city of Meknes in Morocco. (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S93
Parchment · 1 f. · h: 40.6 cm · Eastern Europe · 1913
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

This megillah (on three sheets with 10 columns of text) is from Eastern Europe and was probably created at the beginning of the 20th century. The elaborate case was made by Ezekiel Joshua Maisels in 1913 in Dolyna in Galicia (today Western Ukraine). It is covered with carved images, ornaments and Hebrew inscriptions, and contains scenes from the Purim story at the bottom and from the hanging of Haman in the upper part. In the central part, the crown (keter malchut), symbol of royal rule, is held by two winged lions. The double-headed eagle refers to the Habsburg Empire. (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S94
Parchment · 1 f. · 7.9 x 301 cm · Italy · middle of the 18th century
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

The text on this Esther scroll (on 5 sheets with 42 columns of text) is written in unusually narrow columns, set in golden frames on a greenish background. The hexagonal case made of cast, chased, engraved and granulated silver bears the silver hallmarks of the city of Rome and of the manufacturer Giovanni Battista Sabatini from 1778 to 1780. The initials alef, resh and samech refer to the patron and to the owner. What is unusual is that in this case, the complete original set of scroll, case and leather box has been preserved. (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S95
Parchment · 1 f. · 30.8 x 195 cm · Venice · 1748
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

The calligrapher and artist Arje Leib ben Daniel, who created this megillah (on three sheets with 12 columns of text and a separate sheet with blessings), came from Goraj near Zamość in Lesser Poland. A total of 28 of his megillot have been preserved, eight of which are signed and dated by him. This so-called ha-melech scroll, where each individual column begins with ha-melech ("the king"), was created in Venice in 1748, with the sepia drawings typical of Leib ben Daniel. Influences of Salom Italia’s border designs as well as of Eastern European folk art can be discerned. The artist’s name in the inscription was later replaced by that of Judah Capsuto, who gave the scroll to Ephraim Isaac Capsuto as a Purim gift. (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S101
Parchment · 1 f. · 12.6 x 246.5 cm · Amsterdam · around 1641
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

Salom Italia (about 1619, Mantua – 1655, Amsterdam) divided the text into 30 columns (on four sheets) and placed them in the openings of massive rustica portals. In the niches between these portals, representations of King Ahasuerus and Queen Esther alternate. On the pedestals there are 29 pictures telling the story of the Book of Esther. Salom Italia’s design of the Esther roles, of which a total of eleven works have survived, was of great influence. This megillah is one of three Esther scrolls decorated with pen drawings, which may have served as a model for the copper-engraved borders designed by the same artist. (flu)

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S102
Parchment · 1 f. · 35.5 x 190 cm · Venice · 1564
Megillah Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther scroll

This work is dated to the 3rd Adar of the year 5324 (15 February 1564) in Venice and is thus the earliest dated example of a fully decorated Esther scroll. It was made by Stellina and therefore contains the only early modern megillah that we know to have been created by a woman. The scroll begins with blessings. These are followed by the text, which is placed between arcades. The columns of text are flanked by caryatids carrying antique vases, urn vessels or oil lamps on their heads. In the seventh, thirteenth and nineteenth arcade, the caryatids are replaced by a satyr and a woman with animal paws. All illustrations include gold highlights. The style and motifs correspond to the visual language of contemporary mannerism. (flu)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Heid. 52
Parchment · III + 78 + IV ff. · 19.5-19.7 x 15-15.4 cm · Ashkenaz · 14th century
Sefer Mitsvot Qatan by Isaac ben Joseph of Corbeil with glosses by Perets ben Elijah of Corbeil

The Sefer Mitsvot Qatan or “Small Book of Precepts” is a halakhic compendium, which also includes ethical, aggadic and homiletical material, written ca. 1276-1277 by Isaac ben Joseph of Corbeil, one of the great codifiers and French Tosafists of the 13th century. The work is also called Sheva Ammudei ha-Golah or the “Seven Pillars of the Exile”, due to its division into seven sections, corresponding to the seven days a week, encouraging its daily study. This work is an abridged version of the Sefer Mitsvot Gadol (Semag), another halakhic compendium completed in 1247 by Moses ben Jacob of Coucy (1st half 13th c.). Consequently, with a much more accessible legal code, the Sefer Mitsvot Qatan achieved widespread popularity, receiving recognition from rabbinical authorities from Franco-Germany. This copy includes glosses by R. Isaac’s main disciple, namely Perets ben Elijah of Corbeil (died 1297). (iss)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Heid. 96
Parchment and paper · I + 236 + I‎ ff. · 22-22.2 x 14.5 cm · Italy · 14th -15th century
Sefer ha-Orah by Joseph b. Abraham Gikatilla

The kabbalistic work Sefer ha-Orah or "Gates of Light" is one of the major texts of Jewish mysticism written in thirteenth century Spain, where Kabbalah flourished. It is considered to be the most articulate work on kabbalistic symbolism and its content provides a comprehensive explanation of the Names of God and their designation within the ten sephirot or attributes/emanations, through which Eyn Sof (the Infinite) reveals Itself and continuously creates both the physical and metaphysical realms. The work is organized into ten chapters, one for each sephirah. (iss)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Heid. 123
Parchment · I + 304 + I‎ ff. · 12.8-12.9 x 9.2-9.3 cm · Italy · 15th century
Siddur according to the Roman rite

This well-preserved pocket-sized Siddur, enclosing the statutory prayers of the Jewish liturgical year (daily, sabbath and new month prayers, Ḥanukkah, Purim, Pessaḥ, Shavuot, Rosh ha-Shanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret), is a precious witness of the production of these small prayer books for personal use in 15th- century Italy. (iss)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Heid. 134
Parchment · I + 94 + I ff. · 23-23.1 x 16.5 cm · Poland · 14th century
Mahzor according to the Ashkenazi rite

Beautifully illuminated Maḥzor for Rosh ha-Shanah and Yom Kippur according to the Ashkenazi rite. It is however possible to surmise that this manuscript was produced in Poland during the 14th century, as its script resembles that of contemporary Hebrew manuscript fragments of maḥzorim produced in Poland. This manuscript of middle-sized format, enclosing several ornate initial words and illuminated frames, contains the liturgy for the High Holidays of Rosh ha-Shana and Yom Kippur, including many liturgical poems (piyyutim) displayed in several columns, and was destined for public use by the precentor (ḥazan) at the synagogue. However, the particularity of this maḥzor lies in the presence of a woman’s name, גננא כהנת (Jeanne Kohenet), inserted within the painted letters of a decorated monumental initial word. She was probably the patron of this manuscript and either the daughter or wife of a cohen. The manuscript is incomplete at the beginning and at the end. (iss)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Heid. 166
Paper · II + 46 + I ff. · 32.3 x 22.3 cm · Italy · 15th century
Averroes, Hebrew translation by Qalonymos ben Qalonymos of the Middle Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics

This almost complete Italian 15th century paper copy is composed of Books II to VIII of the Hebrew translation of Averroes’ Middle Commentary on the Physics by Aristotle. The learned Andalusian polymath, jurist and imam, Abu al-Walid Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Rushd – or Averroes (1126-1198), known as the Commentator, devoted his entire life on restoring Aristotle’s original teachings, and writing commentaries on nearly all of Aristotle’s works. He was therefore considered one of the most influential philosophic authorities of the Middle Ages, not only among the Latin Scholastics, but particularly among Jews, for the understanding of Aristotelian science through the Hebrew translations of his commentaries. The Middle Commentary is the least known of Averroes’ commentaries on the Physics and exists today in two complete Hebrew translations from the Arabic and one partial 16th century Hebrew-to-Latin translation. The Hebrew translation found in Ms. Heid. 166 is that of the Provençal Jewish philosopher Qalonymos ben Qalonymos (1286-d. after 1328), entitled Bi᷾ ur ha-Shema’, and was the most widely copied version of the Hebrew translations. (iss)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Heid. 192 A-B
Paper · 128 ff. · 20.5-21 x 14.5 cm · Italy · 1642 and 1687 (Ms. Heid. 192A) and 16th century (Ms. Heid. 192B)
Customs of the Isaac b. Solomon Luria Ashkenazi; Miscellaneous collection of texts

This manuscript is divided into two separate textual units, which were both written by two different scribes in Italy during the 16th and 17th centuries. Ms. Heid. 192A is a small booklet, copied by one hand in 1642 and 1687, which consists of a collection of customs and anecdotes on Rabbi Isaac B. Solomon Luria Ashkenazi (Arizal, 1534-1572) and his entourage, as well as a mystical protective prayer to be recited in the morning and evening, followed by portions of biblical readings for the days of the week, and ending with a selection of penitential prayers (Seliḥot). Ms. Heid. 192B is a miscellaneous collection of biblical midrashim, prognostication literature, tales, Alphabeta de Ben Sira, Talmudic Aggadot. (iss)

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Or. 157
Parchment · VI + 716 + VI pp. · 15 x 10.6-10.8 cm · Italy · 1322
Biblical and ethical miscellany

Illuminated biblical and ethical miscellany produced in Italy in 1322. This small format manuscript, with an exquisite 16th-century white leather binding blindstamped with the coat of arms of the city of Zurich, is divided into two groups of texts. The first section is made up of the biblical texts of the Five Megillot, accompanied by three commentaries on them, composed by the great medieval scholars, Solomon ben Isaac (Rashi), Avraham ibn Ezra and Joseph Qara. The second section is of ethical nature and consists in the Mishna tractate of the Pirqei Avot or Ethics of the Fathers and its commentaries. The first is an anonymous one ; the second is entitled Shemonah Peraqim by Maimonides, as translated by Samuel ibn Tibbon, and the third is a commentary by Rashi placed in the margins of the latter. In addition, this handbook is interspersed with aggadic, midrashic, mystical and philosophical material. (iss)

Online Since: 12/10/2020

Documents: 59, displayed: 41 - 59