Documents: 512, displayed: 501 - 512

Sub-project: e-codices 2017-2020

January 2017

Status: In progress

Financed by: swissuniversities

Description: Continued support from the swissuniversities program “Scientific Information” will ensure the sustainability of e-codices and its transformation from a project to an established service. In addition, it will ensure the continued improvement of technical infrastructure. Such ongoing development is necessary in order to contribute to essential technical developments in the area of interoperability in the coming years. Finally, more sub-projects will be initiated in order to publish online by 2020 most of those Swiss manuscripts that, from a current point of view, are relevant to research.

All Libraries and Collections

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S8
Parchment · 1 f. · 8 x 88 cm · Italy · Scroll: Italy, 18th century / Case: Venice or Rome, 17th century
Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll

Jewish ceremonial objects crafted of gold, such as this Esther scroll case, are exceptionally rare since synagogue and personal Judaica objects were usually made of silver or other less precious material. The cylindrical case of this scroll is ornamented with applied filigree. Emerging from a vase at the center is a large naturalistic flowering wine with scrolling stems and blossoms that extend across the case’s decorated surface. Large blossoms support or frame the objects associated with the Holy Temple of Jerusalem. Although these motifs are frequently found on a variety of Italian Jewish ritual metalwork, they do not relate specifically to the Esther story. In addition, the Ten Tablets of the Law are placed on the largest central floral motif, a wreath composed of small flower forms that may suggest sunflowers. There are two similar Esther scroll cases of this type undoubtedly created by the same maker. They have been localized to seventeenth-century Rome or Venice. This undecorated scroll is probably from the 18th century. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S12
Parchment · 1 + 1 f. · 22.2 x 137 cm + 22.8 x 17.4 cm · Italy · around 1775
Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll

This megillah is embellished with hand-painted, repeated architectural designs. The text is set between alternating straight and spiral marble columns. The Jews of Italy associated twisted columns with those of the Temple of Solomon, which they believed were brought to Rome by Titus and eventually placed in the Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican. In terms of style, this scroll resembles the illuminated ketubot produced in Ferrara and Mantua. Accompanying this scroll is a separate sheet of parchment that, in addition to the benedictions, contains a liturgical hymn, korei megillah, recited by the Jews of Italy. Rabbis disagreed as to whether a scroll may include any extraneous text that is not part of the book of Esther. However, in some communities this led to the practice of creating an unattached sheet featuring the three benedictions traditionally recited prior to the reading of the megillah. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S13
Parchment · 1 f. · 24 x 225 cm · Venice · 1746
Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll

The border design of this Esther scroll is dominated by a baroque arcade featuring four distinctly patterned columns. The arches are surmounted by a balustrade that supports flowering urns, blank medallions, floral scrollwork, and a variety of birds including a crowned double-headed eagle and a peacock. Scenes from the Esther narrative are positioned beneath each of the nineteen columns of text. The engraved border of this scroll was designed by the Italian scholar, artist, and publisher Francesco Griselini (1717-1787), whose engraved border designs were popular in Italy in the eighteenth century. In these illustrations, Griselini has devoted particular attention to architectural settings and spatial perspective. The artist’s printed signature is found in the lower left corner of each membrane. The last scene, placed under the final arch, is rarely found on illustrated Ester scrolls. It depicts the Messiah riding on a donkey heralding the return of the exiled Jewish people back to Jerusalem. The text of this scroll was penned by the scribe-artist Aryeh Leib ben Daniel. In his inscription, which follows the concluding benedictions, he informs the reader that he wrote this scroll in Venice in the winter of 1746. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S17
Parchment · 1 f. · 27.6 x 227 cm · Amsterdam · around 1675
Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll

This profusely illustrated Dutch scroll is distinctive for its thirty-eight illustrations drawn in sepia ink. The decoration of the scroll begins with a triumphal arch reminiscent of Roman Triumphal arches constructed for royal festivities throughout Europe from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century. The scroll also contains some unusual representations. One is of Mordecai standing in a room with a wall filled with books. He is portrayed as a scholar, perhaps reflecting a rabbinic tradition that informs us of his remarkable knowledge of seventy languages, which helped him uncover the plot against Ahasuerus. Another striking illustration is the depiction of two merrymaking dwarves dancing and playing stringed instruments in celebration of the Jews’ delivery from destruction. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Braginsky Collection, S24
Parchment · 1 f. · 22.2 x 176 cm · North Germany · around 1750
Megillat Esther (מגילת אסתר) / Esther Scroll

This eighteenth-century megillah was created in Lower Saxony and exemplifies a type of folk art decoration and color palette found in other megillot from this region. The most distinctive image in this scroll is the one depicting the hanging of Haman. Bound in chains, he is suspended from the gallows. A venomous snake, a symbol of evil, encircles the upright support of the gibbet. Below, a double-tailed lion, an allegoric embodiment of the Jewish people, is depicted holding a crowned shield and gazing up at the execution. This Braginsky Collection megillah is one of three similar German scrolls containing distinctive images of Haman hanging. Inscriptions on the opening and closing panels of this scroll indicate that this scroll was owned by Berel the son of Abraham Neumark of Hamburg. (red)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum, LM 26117
Parchment · 314 ff. · 49 x 34.5 cm · St. Katharinenthal and Hochrhein · around 1312
Gradual from St. Katharinenthal (Thurgau)

This gradual is from the Dominican Convent St. Katharinenthal and represents one of the most important artworks of the Gothic period in Switzerland. Created around 1312 in the convent itself, it was probably illuminated in the area around Lake Constance. It contains more than 80 pen-flourish initials, more than 60 historiated initials and 5 I-initials, which consist of several historiated medallions. Several pieces of the last two I-initials, whose medallions were cut out and sold separately, are known today; they are dispersed among various museums and libraries. In addition to the initials, in the floral friezes there are represented numerous kneeling and praying Dominican nuns as well as other secular donors (e.g., 3v, 18v, 90r, 159v, 161r etc.). Until the 19th century, the gradual was in use in the convent; around 1820 it was ceded to an antiquarian book dealer in Konstanz, Franz Joseph Aloys Castell (1796-1844). After 1860 it was owned by the English collectors Sir William Amherst of Hackney and Sir Charles Dyson Perrins (1864-1958). Upon the death of the latter, his library was offered for sale through Sotheby's, and the manuscript was purchased by the Swiss Confederation with the support of the Gottfried Keller-Foundation and the Canton of Thurgau. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum, LM 29329.1
Parchment · 1 f. · 14 x 16.7 cm · St. Katharinenthal and Hochrhein · around 1312
Fragment with Christ and John the Evangelist from the Gradual of St. Katharinenthal (Thurgau)

Fragment of page f. 158a verso from the gradual of St. Katharinenthal, which was removed in the 19th century, and the miniatures from which were sold separately. The initial A shows Christ bestowing a blessing with John the Evangelist, who is resting his head on Christ's knees; kneeling at their feet is a praying Dominican monk, in the frieze at the side, a Dominican nun. Below the initial there used to be a frame (today in Zürich, Swiss National Museum, LM 29329.2) with a painting of the Madonna of the Apocalypse accompanied by John the Evangelist, while two kneeling Dominicans pray under two arcades. Originally the same leaf also had an initial V (today in Vienna, Graphische Sammlung Albertina, Inv. Nr. 32434) with a very detailed representation of the Maiestas Domini and of the Last Judgement. The fragment belongs to the Swiss Confederation, the Gottfried Keller Foundation and the Canton of Thurgau.  (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum, LM 29329.2
Parchment · 1 f. · 11 x 8.5 cm · St. Katharinenthal and Hochrhein · around 1312
Fragment with Madonna of the Apocalypse and John the Evangelist from the Gradual of St. Katharinenthal (Thurgau)

Fragment of page f. 158a verso from the gradual of St. Katharinenthal, which was removed in the 19th century, and the miniatures from which were sold separately. It shows the Madonna of the Apocalypse, accompanied by John the Evangelist, while two kneeling Dominicans pray under two arcades. The frame was placed below an initial A (today in Zürich, Swiss National Museum, LM 29329.1), which shows Christ bestowing a blessing with John the Evangelist, who is resting his head on head on Christ's knees; kneeling at their feet is a praying Dominican monk, in the frieze at the side, a Dominican nun. Originally the same leaf also had an initial V (today in Vienna, Graphische Sammlung Albertina, Inv. Nr. 32434) with a very detailed representation of the Maiestas Domini and of the Last Judgement. The fragment belongs to the Swiss Confederation, the Gottfried Keller Foundation and the Canton of Thurgau.  (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum, LM 45751
Parchment · 1 f. · ∅ 7 cm · St. Katharinenthal and Hochrhein · around 1312
Fragment with the Crucifixion from the Gradual of St. Katharinenthal (Thurgau)

Fragment with a representation of the crucifixion, from an I-initial. This initial consisted of several medallions and decorated page f. 87a of the gradual of St. Katharinenthal. In the 19th century, this leaf was removed from the gradual, and the medallions were sold separately. Of the 9 or 10 medallions that originally made up the body of the letter I, there are known today, in addition to this one, medallions with the following scenes: the Last Supper (Zurich, Swiss National Museum, Inv. LM 71410), the Arrest of Christ (Nürnberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Inv. Mm. 34 kl), Christ before Pilate (Zurich, Swiss National Museum, LM 55087), the Crowning with Thorns (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 15932), the Bearing of the Cross (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 14312) and the Descent from the Cross (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 15933). The fragment belongs to the Swiss Confederation, the Gottfried Keller Foundation and the Canton of Thurgau.  (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum, LM 55087
Parchment · 1 f. · 7 x 7.4 cm · St. Katharinenthal and Hochrhein · around 1312
Fragment with Christ before Pilate from the Gradual of St. Katharinenthal (Thurgau)

Fragment with a depiction of Christ before Pilate, from an I-Initial. This initial consisted of several medallions and decorated page f. 87a of the gradual of St. Katharinenthal. In the 19th century, this leaf was removed from the gradual, and the medallions were sold separately. Of the 9 or 10 medallions that originally made up the body of the letter I, there are known today, in addition to this one, medallions with the following scenes: the Last Supper (Zurich, Swiss National Museum, LM 71410), the Arrest of Christ (Nürnberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Inv. Mm. 34 kl), the Crowning with Thorns (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 15932), the Bearing of the Cross (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 14312), the Crucifixion (Zurich, Swiss National Museum, LM 45751) and the Descent from the Cross (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 15933). The fragment belongs to the Swiss Confederation, the Gottfried Keller Foundation and the Canton of Thurgau.  (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum, LM 71410
Parchment · 1 f. · 7 x 7.4 cm · St. Katharinenthal and Hochrhein · around 1312
Fragment with the Last Supper from the Gradual of St. Katharinenthal (Thurgau)

Fragment with a representation of the Last Supper, from an I-initial. This initial consisted of several medallions and decorated page f. 87a of the gradual of St. Katharinenthal. In the 19th century, this leaf was removed from the gradual, and the medallions were sold separately. Of the 9 or 10 medallions that originally made up the body of the letter I, there are known today, in addition to this one, medallions with the following scenes: the Arrest of Christ (Nürnberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Inv. Mm. 34 kl), Christ before Pilate (Zurich, Swiss National Museum, LM 55087), the Crowning with Thorns (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 15932), the Bearing of the Cross (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 14312), the Crucifixion (Zurich, Swiss National Museum, LM 45751) and the Descent from the Cross (Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Inv. Nr. 15933). The fragment belongs to the Swiss Confederation, the Gottfried Keller Foundation and the Canton of Thurgau.  (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Zürich, Zentralbibliothek, Ms. Rh. 15
Parchment · 239 ff. · 33-33.5 x 22.5-23 cm · Zürich · ca. 1340/50
Rudolf von Ems, Weltchronik

This richly illustrated manuscript of Rudolf von Ems’ Chronicle of the world was written in the 1340s, probably in Zurich (in the same writing workshop as the 1346 book of statutes of the Zurich Grossmünster). Its iconographic program is closely related to that of the Chronicle of the World currently held in St. Gall (Vadian Collection Ms. 302). Ms. Rh. 15 came to Zurich in 1863 from the library of the dissolved Rheinau Abbey. (wal)

Online Since: 03/29/2019

Documents: 512, displayed: 501 - 512