Documents: 560, displayed: 501 - 520

Sub-project: e-codices 2017-2020

January 2017

Status: In progress

Financed by: swissuniversities

Description: Continued support from the swissuniversities program “Scientific Information” will ensure the sustainability of e-codices and its transformation from a project to an established service. In addition, it will ensure the continued improvement of technical infrastructure. Such ongoing development is necessary in order to contribute to essential technical developments in the area of interoperability in the coming years. Finally, more sub-projects will be initiated in order to publish online by 2020 most of those Swiss manuscripts that, from a current point of view, are relevant to research.

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1720
Paper · 6 + 560 + 2 pp. · 30.5 x 19.5 cm · St. Gall Abbey (P. Gregor Schnyder, P. Chrysostomus Stipplin) · before 1672/around 1706 (with supplements until 1788)
Sacrarium Sancti Galli, Vol. III: consecration of churches, chapels, altars and bells in the territory of the Princely Abbey of Saint Gall

This volume is written primarily in Latin; in the first part (pp. 1-480) it contains information about the consecration of churches, chapels, altars and bells at St. Gall Abbey and in the territory of the “Alte Landschaft” (a subject territory of St. Gall Abbey) (pp. 1-187), in the Thurgau (pp. 188-263), in the Rhine Valley (pp. 264-309), and in the Toggenburg (pp. 310-457); furthermore about the churches in the urban area of St. Gall, St. Lawrence, St. Mangen and St. Leonard (pp. 475-480). This part was written around 1706 by the St. Gall monk and custos Fr. Gregor Schnyder (1642–1708) and contains numerous additions from the period up to 1788. On an unnumbered leaf before p. 57, there is a pen and wash drawing of the monastery’s tower clock that was completed in 1661. The second part (p. 487-556) is written by the St. Gall monk Chrysostomus Stipplin (1609–1672). It contains a calendar of the feast days of saints for St. Gall Abbey, indicating for each one where the respective celebration is held (pp. 487-501), a list of chapels and altars with the dates of their consecration (pp. 501-502), two lists of altar patronages (pp. 503-506 and 507-509) arranged according to the calendar, an overview of all the altars together with the relics they contained (pp. 509-515), as well as a list of all relics in the monastery and its chapels (pp. 519-556). The first part concludes with a site index (from the time period of the last additions). (sno)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1721
Paper · 352 ff. · 33.5 × 20 cm · St. Gall Abbey (F. Kolumban Brändle; Brother Gall Beerle) · after 1769 (binding: 1785)
Sacrarium Sancti Galli, Vol. IV: Description of the festivities on the occasion of the transfers of catacomb saints to churches and monasteries of the Princely Abbey of Saint Gall in the 17th and 18th century

In this volume, written primarily in German, the St. Gall custos Fr. Kolumban Brändle (1720−1780) as author and compiler and Brother Gall Beerle (1734−1816) as scribe tell of the festivities that occurred on the occasion of the transfer of catacomb saints to the territory of the Princely Abbey of Saint Gall in the 18th century. The general introduction (fol. Vr – fol. VIIIr) is followed by sometimes extensive documentation about the transfers of Benedict to the Capuchin Convent of St. Scholastica in Rorschach in 1732 (fol. IXv2v), of Justin to Gossau in 1743 (fol. 63v68v), of Julian to the Capuchin Convent Notkersegg in 1748 (fol. 69v77v), of Valentine to Goldach in 1761 (fol. 78v129v), of Celestine to Waldkirch in 1763 (fol. 130v167r), of Clementia to the Benedictine Convent of St. Wiborada in St. Georgen in 1769 (fol. 168v226v), of Theodorus to Neu St. Johann in 1685 (fol. 228v237r), of Placidus, Felicissimus, Victor, Prosper and Redempta to Neu St. Johann in 1689 (fol. 238v246r), about the centenary of the transfer of Theodorus to Neu St. Johann in 1755 (fol. 247r265r) and the centenary of the transfer of Marinus to Lichtensteig in 1757 (fol. 266v291r), as well as about the transfer of Theodorus to Berneck in 1766 (fol. 292v352v). These descriptions are accompanied by watercolor paintings of the catacomb saints dressed in festive garb. In addition the volume contains records, documents and reports about the authorization obtained from Rome to venerate Eusebius of Viktorsberg as a saint in the territory of the Princely Abbey of Saint Gall (fol. 3v54v) as well as about the order of the Pancratius-procession in Wil in 1738 (fol. 55r62v). The volume also contains a little-know ink sketch of Iberg Castle near Wattwil (fol. 238v). (smu)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1722
Parchment · 244 (246) + 111 (113) + 67 (72) ff. · 13.5-36.5 x 9.5-46.5 cm · St. Gall Abbey, P. Ambrosius Epp · 1785
Sacrarium Sancti Galli, Vol. V: De sacra Suppellectili et alia (“Über die heiligen Geräte“)

This collection of papers was compiled in 1785 by the custos of St. Gall Abbey, P. Ambrosius Epp (1572–1817). In several parts, it contains drawings, descriptions and inventories of part of the treasury of St. Gall Abbey (the so-called sacred liturgical objects), as well as documents related to them. Part 1 (pp. 1157) includes pen and ink drawings of chalices, cruets, platters, coats of arms, candlesticks etc., also drawings of 4 altars. Part 2 (fol. 1240, with an index on p. 161-166 of part 1) contains inventories of church treasure from the 17th and 18th century. Several inventories are undated, others are dated (to 1665, 1691, 1712, 1720, 1723, 1739 and 1781). Part 3 (fol. 1104, with an index on fol. 242244 of part 2) is a collection of documents regarding the earlier-mentioned objects — invoices, letters, diary entries, etc., mostly in chronological order. Part 4 (pp. 167 and fol. 6895, with an index on fol. 107110 of part 3) are handwritten and printed privileges and indulgences. (sno)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1727
Paper · II + 516 pp. · 29 x 19.5 cm · after 1599/1st half of the 17th century
Alchemy Compendium: Aureum Vellus oder Guldin Schatz und Kunstkammer, Books I–III

Verbatim copy of Books I-III of the Alchemy Compendium Aureum Vellus oder Guldin Schatz und Kunstkammer printed in 1598/99 by Georg Straub in Rorschach. The woodcuts in the third part (Splendor Solis, pp. 219270) are executed as colored watercolors and, except for a small number of differences, are copied exactly from the print version. A pen and wash drawing on p. 116 depicts Paracelsus. (sno)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1759
Paper · 628 pp. · 51 x 36 cm · St. Gall Abbey (F. Martin ab Yberg; F. Notker Grögle) · around 1770
Antiphonarium officii for the St. Gall Abbey Church, winter portion

Winter portion of a large-format antiphonary in two volumes (summer portion in Cod. Sang. 1760) for the Liturgy of the Hours of the monks of St. Gall, written around 1770 by the St. Gall monk Martin ab Yberg (1741−1777) and richly illustrated with small watercolor paintings surrounded by flowery rococo frames by Father Notker Grögle (1740−1816). This volume, decorated with especially splendid baroque brass fittings, contains the chants of the monks of St. Gall for the feasts of Jesus Christ and of the saints between the first Sunday of Advent and the Feast of the Ascension. It is divided into the parts Proprium de tempore (pp. 1357), Proprium sanctorum (pp. 358500) and Commune sanctorum (pp. 501559). These are followed by suffrages and by antiphons and responsories for workdays (pp. 560616). Chants for the feast days of the Archangel Gabriel and of St. Scholastica are added (pp. 617626). The melodies are written in Gothic German plainsong notation (“Hufnagelnotation”) on five lines. This volume came to the Abbey Library from the choir library of St. Gallen Cathedral in 1930. (smu)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1760
Paper · IV + 462 pp. · 50 × 35,5 cm · St. Gall Abbey (F. Martin ab Yberg; F. Notker Grögle) · 1770
Antiphonarium officii for the St. Gall Abbey Church, summer portion

Summer portion of a large-format antiphonary in two volumes (winter portion in Cod. Sang. 1759) for the Liturgy of the Hours of the monks of St. Gall, written in the year 1770 (chronogram in silver on the frontispiece) by the St. Gall monk Martin ab Yberg (1741−1777) and richly illustrated with small watercolor paintings surrounded by flowery rococo frames by Father Notker Grögle (1740−1816). This volume, decorated with splendid baroque brass fittings, contains the chants of the monks of St. Gall for the Liturgy of the Hours on feasts of Jesus Christ and of the saints between Pentecost and the last Sunday after Pentecost. It contains the parts Proprium de tempore (pp. 1113), Proprium sanctorum (pp. 114353) and Commune sanctorum (pp. 354400). These are followed by suffrages and by antiphons and responsories for workdays (pp. 401431). Chants for the feast days of St. Joachim and of the Archangel Raphael are added (pp. 432440). The melodies are written in Gothic German plainsong notation (“Hufnagelnotation”) on five lines. This volume came to the Abbey Library from the choir library of St. Gallen Cathedral in 1930. (smu)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1762
Paper · IV + 300 pp. · 48.5 x 35 cm · St. Gall Abbey: Dominikus Feustlin · 1757
Antiphonary, winter part

Winter part of an antiphonary that was originally set up in two volumes and later, when it was bound, was divided into four volumes. The antiphonary, whose other volumes are preserved in Cod. Sang. 1763, 1764 and 1795, was written and probably also decorated by Fr. Dominikus Feustlin (1713–1782). His style is characterized by vividly colored frames made up of thousands of small rods surrounding initials and title cartouches. Title page with the coat-of-arms of St. Gall, St. John, the Toggenburg and Abbot Cölestin Gugger von Staudach (1740–1767) on p. III. More decorated title cartouches on p. 1, 45, 48, 53, 101, 104, 162, 178, 202 and 214. The winter part includes the Proprium de tempore for the first of Advent until Ash Wednesday (pp. 1161), the Proprium de Sanctis for November until February (pp. 162213), the Commune Sanctorum (pp. 214251), votive Masses (pp. 252272) and Antiphonae feriales (pp. 272297). (sno)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1767
Parchment · IV + 556 pp. · 55.5–56 x 39.5–40 cm · around 1500/1520
Graduale de tempore

Graduale de tempore, commissioned by Prince-Abbot Franz Gaisberg (1504–1529, coat of arms p. 1) and illuminated by the book illustrator Nikolaus Bertschi from Augsburg (initials, miniatures and borders with vine scrolls and animals). The banderole on p. 55, which ends with etc. 156, may give a (false) indication regarding the dating (1506 or 1516?). The chants for the Mass are written in German plainsong notation (“Hufnagelnotation”) on a five line staff. This codex is the largest of the St. Gall Abbey library’s manuscripts. Originally it was even larger; for re-binding, the pages were severely trimmed, as can be discerned from the folded lower margin on p. 1 or from the trimmed border on p. 444. Binding with heavy fittings on a red velvet background. (sno)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1853c
Paper · 236 pp. · 10.5 x 8 cm · Convent of Capuchin nuns Notkersegg near St. Gallen: Br. Mathias Jansen · 1774
Br. Mathias Jansen, Interpretation of the paintings of St. Gallen Cathedral and report on the elevation of the remains of St. Otmar in 1774

This small-format volume contains two written works by the hand of Mathias Jansen, as attested by a 1774 colophon on p. 201. On pp. 7-39, Jansen gives a kind of inventory of the paintings of St. Gallen Cathedral, describing each vault and field. Page 20 contains a report on the improvement of a painting representing St. Otmar and other saints.The second work, on pp. 40-201, collects historical reports about the life, the afterlife and the cult of St. Otmar, which take the form of log entries recording decisions as well as preparations for and the process of actions related to the cult of the saint, such as the elevation of the remains of St. Otmar in 1773/1774. On p. 99, there is a drawing of a decorated altar. Pages 202-207 contain later additions from 1823 or shortly thereafter. On p. 39 and p. 202 there are sporadic entries (after 1823) about the bas-reliefs by the sculptor Johann Christian Wentzinger, on p. 39 also about the new paintings by the artist Antonio Moretto in the choir. Pages 1-6 and 208-236 are blank. According to a note on the inside of the front cover, this book, originally from the Notkersegg Convent of Capuchin nuns, became the property of St. Gall Bishop Greith probably around 1852. Since 1930 it has been held in the Abbey Library as a deposit of the episcopal library. (nie)

Online Since: 06/13/2019

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1902
Parchment · 394 + w–z pp. · 12.5 x 9 cm · probably Diocese of Constance · 14th century
Psalter/Breviary, Dominican

Psalter/Breviary for a Dominican women’s convent. On pp. 1-12 it contains a calendar of saints with many female saints and several rare saints. The presence of saints from St. Gall and Constance suggests that the volume was created in the Diocese of Constance. On pp. 390-393 there are instructions for prayer in German. Noteworthy are thirteen miniatures and initials in gold leaf. This volume is from the convent of Dominican nuns of St. Katharina auf dem Nollenberg near Wuppenau (Thurgau); according to a note of ownership, it was the property of the convent at least since the 16th century. Since 1930 it has been a deposit of the episcopal library of St. Gall at the Abbey Library. (sno)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1903
Parchment · 810 pp. · 13.5 x 9–9.5 cm · Southern Germany (?) · second half of the 15th century
Breviary (Diurnal), Dominican

Dominican breviary for nuns, probably written in Southern Germany. The script and decoration follow 14th century models, but the presence of the saints St. Vincent Ferrer (canonized 1453/54) and St. Catherine of Siena (canonized 1461) suggest an origin not before the second half of the 15th century. Numerous initials with gold leaf and scroll ornamentation, illuminated borders on p. 21 and 168 (two dogs, misericordia and Justicia, hunting a stag, Verbum patris). This volume is from the convent of Dominican nuns of St. Katharina auf dem Nollenberg near Wuppenau (Thurgau); according to a note of ownership, it was the property of the convent at least since the 17th century. Since 1930 it has been a deposit of the episcopal library of St. Gall at the Abbey Library. (sno)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1908
Parchment · 252 pp. · 15–15.5 x 10–10.5 cm · 14th century
Spiritual sermons and speeches; Der Mönch von Heilsbronn, Das Buch von den sechs Namen des Fronleichnams

This manuscript contains the 14 so-called Hermetschwiler Predigten on pp. 1-140; it is a 13th century cycle of sermons in High Alemannic, for which this manuscript is the only textual witness. The text is defective in the beginning and at the end. This is followed on pp. 141-214 by the German-language treatise on Corpus Christi by the “Mönch von Heilsbronn”, a monk from the Cistercian Heilsbronn Abbey located between Nuremberg and Ansbach, who probably lived in the 14th century. Pp. 214-252 contain more spiritual speeches. At least from the 19th century on, the volume was at the Benedictine Convent Hermetschwil (Aargau). Since 1930 it has been a deposit of the episcopal library of St. Gall at the Abbey Library. (sno)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1917
Paper · 342 pp. · 20.5 x 14.5 cm · presumably St. Gall, Dominican Convent of St. Katharina · 15th century
Compilatio Mystica (Greith’scher Traktat)

Compilation of mystical treatises, referred to as the Greith’scher Traktat for the first editor Carl Greith (1807 -1882, Bishop of St. Gall from 1862). The primary sources for the German text are Meister Eckhart, Johannes Tauler and Henry Suso. The manuscript, which is defective at the end, is from the Convent of Dominican nuns of St. Katharina in St. Gall (later Wil), where it was probably written as well. Even the text itself may have been compiled by a scribe from the convent, based on a collection of texts. Since 1930 it has been a depositof the episcopal library of St. Gall at the Abbey Library. (sno)

Online Since: 12/14/2018

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St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 2135
Paper · 127 pp. · 36 x 24.5 cm · Abbey of St. Gall (Joseph Adam Bürke; F. Notker Grögle) · 1774
Pontifical vesperal of St. Gall Prince-Abbot Beda Angehrn from 1774

This vesperal in a distinguished binding was commissioned by Prince-Abbot Beda Angehrn (1767−1796); it was written in 1774 by Joseph Adam Bürke (chronogram with the name of the scribe on p. 92), an alumnus of the Gymnasium (preparatory school) of Neu St. Johann that was led by St. Gall monks, and richly illustrated by Father Notker Grögle (1740−1816). The volume contains the incipits of the chants for Vespers (antiphons and hymns), written in German plainsong notation (“Hufnagelnotation”) on five lines, for the feasts of Jesus Christ and of the saints for the entire liturgical year. It is divided into the parts Proprium de tempore (pp. 136), Proprium sanctorum (pp. 3780) and Commune sanctorum (pp. 8192). This manuscript was held in the choir library of St. Gallen Cathedral until 1989. Then it was transferred to the archives of the cathedral parish of St. Gall, and in 2014 it came to the Abbey Library of St. Gall. The volume, which consisted of 96 pages in 1774, was certainly used for the liturgy in the Cathedral of St. Gall until the 1930s. The mostly handwritten additions and supplements (after p. 97) date from the 19th century. Also glued and bound into the volume are texts from unspecified printed liturgical publications of the 19th and early 20th century. Noteworthy among the illustrations is the oldest pictorial depiction to date of the newly built “Gallusmünster”, today the Cathedral of St. Gall (p. 72). On the flyleaf is the finely drawn coat of arms of Prince-Abbot Beda Angehrn. (smu)

Online Since: 09/26/2017

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Stuttgart, Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Cod. Don. B VI 4
Parchment · 1 f. · 41.5 x 27 cm · Fulda · ca. 1156
Fulda Legendary

Leaf from the fourth volume (Juli-August) of a Fulda Legendary that originally consisted of six volumes, commissioned in 1156 by Rugger, monk at Frauenberg Abbey in Fulda (1176-1177 abbot of Fulda as Rugger II). This fragment contains parts of the Vita s. Amalbergae and probably was written by Eberhard of Fulda. The legendary was still used in the middle of the 16th century in Fulda by Georg Witzel (1501-1573) for his Hagiologium seu de sanctis ecclesiae (Mainz 1541) as well as for his Chorus sanctorum omnium. Zwelff Bücher Historien Aller Heiligen Gottes (Köln 1554). This is the only verifiable fragment from the 4th volume. The remaining surviving fragments from the legendary are in Basel, Solothurn and Nuremberg. They are from the third (May-June) and sixth (November-December) volume and show that these volumes at least reached Basel, where both evidently were used as manuscript waste around 1580. (stb)

Online Since: 06/13/2019

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Tesserete, Archivio parrocchiale, codice 1
Parchment · III + 190 pp. · 31.5 x 22.5 cm · Northern Italy (Milan) · 1342
Epistolarium ambrosianum

This manuscript, as yet almost unknown, contains an epistolary following the Ambrosian Rite. It was commissioned in 1342 by the priest Giacomo de Parazo for a church dedicated to St. Fermo not further identified. This manuscript probably reached Tesserete (Canton of Ticino), an area where the Ambrosian Rite was used, in the 15th/16th century; here it was taken apart and rebound, at which time was added a copy of a testament of dubious authenticity written in 1078 by Contessa from the city of Milan for the benefit of the church of S. Stefano in Tesserete. In the 17th century, the manuscript was the property of the Verdoni family of notaries; since the 20th century, it has been held by the parish of Tesserete. On the initial page, St. Ambrose, the patron saint of the diocese of Milan, is represented in an illuminated initial. (ber)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Fa Zellweger 90/A : 01.1
Paper · 31 ff. · 37 x 32.5 cm · Trogen · 1891
Chronicle of the Zellweger family, vol. 1

Album with depictions of members of the Zellweger family of textile merchants from Trogen, with biographical texts on the male representatives of the family. From the early modern era until the middle of the 19th century, the Zellwegers shaped the economy and politics of Appenzell Ausserrhoden. Victor Eugen Zellweger, the author of these texts, saw to the reproduction of family-owned paintings, drawings and prints, making use of the most modern techniques of photography. For the calligraphic design and illustration of the 3-volume work, he engaged the illustrator Salomon Schlatter from St. Gall. (eis)

Online Since: 03/29/2019

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Fa Zellweger 90/A : 01.2
Paper · 26 ff. · 37 x 32.5 cm · Trogen · 1891
Chronicle of the Zellweger family, vol. 2

Album with depictions of members of the Zellweger family of textile merchants from Trogen, with biographical texts on the male representatives of the family. From the early modern era until the middle of the 19th century, the Zellwegers shaped the economy and politics of Appenzell Ausserrhoden. Victor Eugen Zellweger, the author of these texts, saw to the reproduction of family-owned paintings, drawings and prints, making use of the most modern techniques of photography. For the calligraphic design and illustration of the 3-volume work, he engaged the illustrator Salomon Schlatter from St. Gall. (eis)

Online Since: 03/29/2019

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Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Fa Zellweger 90/A : 01.3
Paper · 39 ff. · 37 x 32.5 cm · Trogen · 1891
Chronicle of the Zellweger family, vol. 3

Album with depictions of members of the Zellweger family of textile merchants from Trogen, with biographical texts on the male representatives of the family. From the early modern era until the middle of the 19th century, the Zellwegers shaped the economy and politics of Appenzell Ausserrhoden. Victor Eugen Zellweger, the author of these texts, saw to the reproduction of family-owned paintings, drawings and prints, making use of the most modern techniques of photography. For the calligraphic design and illustration of the 3-volume work, he engaged the illustrator Salomon Schlatter from St. Gall. (eis)

Online Since: 03/29/2019

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Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, cod. 6 (JUD040)
Parchment · IV + 476 + IV ff. · 23.7 x 19 cm · Spain (Castile?) · 1st half of the 14th century
Bibel with Masora magna and Masora parva

Sephardic Bible in Hebrew, produced in the first half of the 14th century in Spain, probably in Castile. The manuscript opens and closes with Masoretic lists (ff. IIr-IXv and 463v to 466v), which, framed by illuminated borders, form “carpet pages”. The biblical text, copied into one or two columns, is accompanied by the Small and Large Masora (rules from the rabbinic tradition regarding the reading and vocalization of the sacred texts), which were written in tiny letters in the margins and in the gutters. These micrographic elements are sometimes enlivened in the lower margins of the pages (about 70 occurrences) or on all four sides of the pages (e.g., ff. 42r-43r, 461v-463r), where they form magnificent geometrical figures and interlace. The first biblical books are introduced by titles that are executed in browned gold on background fields of pink and blue with white scrollwork (f. 1v/Gn, 33v/Ex, 59v/Nb, 77v/Dt, 102v/Js, 125v/Jg). According to a note of ownership (f. 467v) dated 1367 (?), this Hebrew Bible was probably owned by David ha-Cohen Coutinho, member of a family of Portuguese marranos. In the 15th century, it was the property of Moses Abulafia, until his widow sold it, as shown by the sales contract, dated and signed in 1526 in Thessaloniki and placed in the beginning of the book (f. Ir). In the 16th century, the Bible was owned by the Talmudist and Rabbi Abraham di Boton of Thessaloniki (f. 467v). Thereafter its presence is attested in the Zaradel Synagogue of Alexandria in the 19th century (R. Gottheil, „Some Hebrew Manuscripts in Cairo“ in: Jewish Quarterly Review 17, 1905, p. 648). After the Bible entered the fine arts market, it has been in a private collection since 1996. (rou)

Online Since: 12/14/2017

Documents: 560, displayed: 501 - 520